Lombroso, Cesare


Lombroso, Cesare
(1835–1909)
   Born in Verona, Lombroso was a pioneer in the field of criminology. His early career was as an army surgeon, but he subsequently became professor of mental illness at the University of Pavia and, influenced by Darwinian ideas of natural selection, began to develop his ideas on inherited criminal traits. Unlike the theologically inspired experts of the time, Lombroso did not believe that crime was due to the innate wickedness of humanity. Rather, he argued in his book L’Uomo Delinquente(Criminal Man, 1876) that criminals were genetically (as we would say today) disposed to crime. Lombardo argued that the born criminal could be identified by certain physical characteristics (large jaws, shifty eyes, long arms, flattened noses). Criminals were human beings who had degenerated rather than evolved.
   The positive aspect of this theory was that Lombroso argued that criminals should be treated humanely and that the death penalty should be abolished. He advocated a prison regime that tried to rehabilitate its inmates. The negative aspect of Lombroso’s work was that it spilled over into racial theorizing. Like many other theorists of his time, Lombroso believed that science had demonstrated that Europeans were a superior race that had evolved further than the rest of the species. The eugenics movement, the attempt to breed a higher form of humanity, regarded Lombroso’s work as fundamental. Lombroso also advanced the interesting theory that artistic genius is closely connected to insanity. His work with psychiatric art was regarded as a groundbreaking attempt to understand the workings of the mind. Lombroso died in Turin in October 1909.

Historical Dictionary of Modern Italy. . 2007.

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  • LOMBROSO, CESARE — (1835–1909), Italian physician and criminologist. Born in Verona, Lombroso studied at Pavia, Padua, and Vienna. Lombroso took degrees in medicine and surgery in 1858. After his military service as a surgeon in the Italian army, he worked as a… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Lombroso, Cesare — ▪ Italian criminologist born Nov. 6, 1835, Verona, Austrian Empire [now in Italy] died Oct. 19, 1909, Turin, Italy       Italian criminologist whose views, though now largely discredited, brought about a shift in criminology from a legalistic… …   Universalium

  • Lombroso, Cesare — (1835–1909)    Italian pioneer of criminology. Lombroso, a medical man and a professor at Turin, laid the foundations of modern criminology. At first his work classified only the inherited physical and mental traits in the ‘born criminal’, but he …   Who’s Who in Jewish History after the period of the Old Testament

  • Lombroso, Cesare — ► (1836 1909) Antropólogo italiano. Fue elegido miembro ordinario del Consejo Sanitario de la provincia de Turín y presidente honorario de la Sociedad de ética de Londres. Autor de El hombre delincuente (1876), donde expone su famosa teoría del… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Lombroso, Cesare — (1836 1909) An Italian army physician who developed the theory of the criminal type. Although he modified his views over his life, he is primarily known for studying the physiognomies of criminals, and suggesting that much crime was biological… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Lombroso — Lombroso, Cesare …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Lombroso — Cesare Lombroso Cesare Lombroso (* 6. November 1835 in Verona; † 19. Oktober 1909 in Turin) war ein italienischer Arzt, Professor der gerichtlichen Medizin und Psychiatrie. Er gilt als Begründer der kriminalanthropologisch ausgerichteten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cesare Lombroso — (* 6. November 1835 in Verona; † 19. Oktober 1909 in Turin) war ein italienischer Arzt, Professor der gerichtlichen Medizin und Psychiatrie. Er gilt als Begründer der kriminalanthropologisch ausgerichteten sogenannten Positiven Schule der K …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cesare Lombroso — Born 6 November 1835 …   Wikipedia

  • Cesare Lombroso — C. Lombroso Naissance 6 novembre 1835 Vérone …   Wikipédia en Français


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